Tuesday, November 6, 2012

Polish Days: MAN- icure


Hello everyone!



It's Polish Days again, and today's task is to make a "MAN- icure" to raise awareness on mens' health, like the annual Movember movement, that has spread from Australia to more and more countries. Most women can't grow moustaches, but we can do our nails to raise awareness. So here's my version of the MAN- icure, and as usual you can find thumbnails to the other participants interpretations on the end of the post.



Polish Days is organized by Hannah from Polly Polish. And if you want information about Polish Days, and how to join in, just click on the badge above. I didn't participate last month, because I tried some freehand painting that didn't turn out as I had planned.



MAN- icure
Today, I chose to make symbols for "man" and a heart. And on the thumb, I tried to make a tie, a shirt, and a jacket, but I wish I hadn't tried to make the jacket.

MAN- icure


Where I live, prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men, and I nearly started crying when I read the statistics. Having readers from 80 countries, I tried to find information about men's health on a global level, but when I looked up movember.com, it immediately showed information for my country. So I hope everyone will be redirected to his/ her countries' statistics from movember.com. There you can find information about men's health, how to help with the fundraising for research and for global research collaboration, where to donate, how much money has been raised, and other things.

MAN- icure


Men's Health Magazine is also a nice source of information on mens' health and how to stay healthy. They write about men's health, fitness, food, weight loss, relationships and sex. It's possible to follow them on Twitter and other social media.

MAN- icure


When I googled prostate cancer, I read that; "The PSA blood test is often done to screen men for prostate cancer. Because of PSA testing, most prostate cancers are now found before they cause any symptoms."

MAN- icure


I have heard that men don't see their physician as often as women, and that they talk less about their problems. So if there is something we could help men with, it could perhaps be to ask them how they feel, and to push them out of the door and on their way to the physician when they need it. With all illnesses, both physical and mental, the prognosis is better if treatment starts early, or if it's still possible to prevent it.

MAN- icure


Another thing that is important is to work for free medical help. In many European countries the patient don't have to pay for treatment in hospital, and only pays up to a certain amount of money each year for appointments with psychologist/ doctor/ physiotherapist. This means that the family don't get an extra economic burden when a loved one gets ill. This is of course important for both men and women, and I think it's because of today's election in the US that I remembered to bring it up. It makes me very sad when I think about how difficult life can get for people who get ill, lose their homes, or loose their jobs in countries where the state don't give them the help they need, like now after Sandy.

MAN- icure


Lani

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